Dani Coronado

Kansas City, MO

Dani was born and raised in St. Louis County, Missouri. In 2011 she moved to Kansas City, Missouri to attend the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC), majoring in Art Education and Studio Art and minoring in Mathematics. She is currently pursuing a Graduate degree in Studio Art at UMKC.  

She pulls inspiration from artists who push the boundaries of cultural norms, calling for conversation about ethnic, racial, gender and/or sexual issues. Themes include her ethnic background, the history of assimilation of immigrants, and even the conservative ideals of the church. Her center belief is culture is what makes us who we are, and there are so many aspects of it, yet we are stifled by white-male-hetero-normative systems of oppression that are sadly now inherent to even the communities youngest members. Her art gives a wonderful visual representation of cultures, granting us a venue to spot similarities and admire differences, so that we can ultimately spawn dramatic and progressive changes in our sphere.  

Primarily a painter, she also practices printmaking and fiber work.  Drawing is a passion, usually with colorful inks or markers.  Her work incorporates unique elements using a mixture of acrylic and oil paints. She is a new member with the  Kansas City Artists Coalition. She has been commissioned for multiple portraits and scenes throughout Missouri. Her art has steady engagements with galleries across the Midwest, most recently the Jones in Kansas City and Jacoby Art Center in Alton, Illinois.   

Her website is currently being designed, so art and information is available via instagram: @DanIAm41_Art. Prints and select originals are for sale. She has experience designing commissions to fit a variety of funding and schedule requirements.

Artist’s Statement

“Soy Peruana, pero soy Americana. As our world continues to grow in acceptance of other cultures, expanding our “world view”, I struggle with the ideas of assimilation that I have grown up with. I am multi-ethnic with only a narrow gaze into my first generation immigrant family history. In my art, I explore the historical traditions, native resources, and powerful symbols of the Incan culture. Using color and various textures I intend to address these qualities, especially those which ascribe to Peruvian women. I focus most of my pieces on finding my personal identity as a half-Peruvian female who grew up in an American household, the attributes of conservatism that I find in my hispanic-Catholic upbringings, and the political tensions of the U.S. in relation to my bloodline.”

Killifish de Titicaca

print

16″x20″ 

$50

Nunca Mi Qinceanera

print

16″x20″ 

$50

Chica Morada

print

16″x20″

$50